Proofreader vs. Editor

The basics:

  • A proofreader will examine while an editor will make direct and deliberate changes to your text.
  • A proofreader will make marks because something is wrong with the punctuations used, grammar, and typos were found. An editor will do that and also make marks because the text can be written/communicated better. 
  • A proofreader won’t tell you that your manuscript is lacking or your writing hasn’t matured enough to be presented to an audience. An editor will attempt to develop your manuscript if they feel it flatly sucks. 

• Who do you need?

  • Are you confident that your manuscript is structurally sound and that people are ready to read it? 
  • Are you an experienced  writer who gets their work critiqued?
  • Do you just want someone to review your work?

You need a proofreader. 

Main idea:

a proofreader’s job is to perfect bodies of work that are already well-written to enhance its delivery.

  • Do you think your manuscript is ready for publication but are having doubts about somethings? 
  • Have you gotten bad feedback about your work that you hadn’t expected?
  • Is your writing not getting the attention from readers you had hoped for? 

You need an editor. 

Main idea: an editor’s job is to make your manuscript something people want to read. Their main job is to elevate writing.

• Price Differences

Proofreading costs less and in most cases, a lot less. This is mostly because an editor is offering more than just the technical stuff. They’re giving up their good ideas for you to use and to take credit for. They’re also giving you their technical and industry experience on what works and what sells.

Main idea: proofreading costs less.

• Project Time Differences

proofreading a standard 200 page book can take 2-3 weeks on average. This depends on what agreements are made and the proofreader of course. Editing can take anywhere from a month to even 9 months, depending. 

Main idea: proofreading takes weeks and editing takes months.

Happy writing!

-E

Photo via Visualhunt

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